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We like to do things alone. We enjoy meals in airports waiting for our flight. Walks through our neighborhoods help us clear our heads. Watching a movie by ourselves helps us indulge in fantasies we hold dear. Being solitary is awesomely valuable to help us recollect our thoughts through moments of peace. “Me time” is a lot of people’s favorite time. But humans are social creatures. We go (literally) insane if we spend too much time alone. We’re addicted to connection and communication. In fact, much of today’s modern economy is built on top of tools that help us collaborate with each other: Facebook, Google, WhatsApp and even PicsArt. We crave interaction just as much (if not more) than we crave our alone time. PicsArt recognizes this. We know that discovery, inspiration and discussions are the building blocks for the creative process. That’s why PicsArt’s #FreeToEdit initiative is so important. No…

Think back to the mid 1800s. Cameras were just becoming a “thing.” The first photograph was snapped in 1814 by Joseph Nicephore Niepce and ever since then, photography has become the lynchpin of billion dollar industries. Film. Television. Movies. Smartphones. Computers. Magazines. Newspapers. Our newfound ability to truly represent the world around us was fascinating and we were addicted. Over time, more and more people got cameras and began capturing the world around them. It didn’t take long for everyone to start chatting with one another and creating groups around specific photographic topics. Those groups are called communities and they’ve transformed photography into the powerhouse hobby it is today. Communities are important because our interests aren’t solitary, no matter how weird they are. As we’ve created more and more ways to connect with each other (largely thanks to the internet and social networking), we’ve been able to find people who have…

Have you ever pretended to be something you’re not? And no, not in your job right now or who you are at school. I mean, have you ever pretended to be a wizard or a mermaid or a queen or a jet fighter or a gymnast or an animal? Have you ever used your imagination to become something fanciful? The chances are that you have. And wasn’t that fun? Wasn’t it amazing to forget who you were for a bit? To explore a different land as something that could only exist in your imagination? What if you had a record — a snapshot — of what these imaginations looked like? With photo editing, you can. When we think of photo editing, lots of us think about adjustments: brightness, contrast, shadows, highlights, etc. The reason why? Well, intensive photo editing looks hard. It looks like it takes too much time and,…

Hello PicsArt! Today I’m happy to announce that Bea will be taking over for me moving forward. She’ll be the person to turn to when you have a product idea and will be writing the Weekly Community Updates starting next week. You all know her pretty well as she’s been a frequent contributor and conversation starter. In addition to that, Bea has planned some incredible events for PicsArt, collaborated closely with all of you and will be more involved in the product going forward. And, as a personal note, Bea is one of my all-time favorite people — so treat her well! As for me? I will be leaving PicsArt at the end of this week for another opportunity. I know. It’s sad. My reasons are my own, personal, and don’t reflect on PicsArt as a product. PicsArt is an incredible tool and I know that it will continue to see success…

Did you know that your DSLR has a (not so) secret tool that will help you get a perfect exposure every single time? Like, literally every single time no matter what? Well. You do. Today I’m going to show you how to read a histogram. But would you believe me if I also told you that most amateur/hobbyist photographers don’t use it? Well, that’s also true. It’s probably because the histogram looks drab, boring, and at odds with the creative process of snapping incredible photos. It’s probably because it looks like this: I know. Enormously dull. Here’s the thing though: it’s also enormously helpful. That black and white graph shows you the distribution of pixels on a scale of pure black (not good) to pure white (also not good). The left third(ish) of a histogram is shadows, the middle third(ish) is midtones, and the right third(ish) is highlights. A well-exposed image has…

Hey there! Last week we opened up the door to let you ask the team any questions that may have been on your mind. We got a bunch of questions and have picked out the three most common ones for your reading pleasure below! (Also, don’t forget to scroll to the bottom of this post to see our favorite tutorials!) How are featured images chosen? Right now, featured images are chosen by real-life, human people. They’re the same people who deal with reported images and we love them. Our moderators are actively reviewing your images as they’re submitted to PicsArt and care deeply about making sure original, high-quality work is shown off. Eventually, we’ll use more algorithms to show you more relevant, trending info. Can I submit tutorials to PicsArt for them to be published? Yes! Absolutely! This is a really easy question to answer, because we created a submission…

Music festivals like Coachella bring you the best acts in the world, but they also bring you undisputed spectacle. Millions of dollars are poured into stage setups you’ll never see anywhere else, larger-than-life art pieces, and the infrastructure that keeps the whole place running. Since only the press is allowed to bring in DSLR cameras, you’re going to be relying on your mobile device to capture your memories in the most accurate, artistic way you can. While no photo will compare to the incredible time you’re about to have (trust me, this is my fourth year), here are some tips that will help you capture the most epic music festival photos. Look for spectacle. Coachella is larger than life, a pop-up town of over 80,000 people complete with flashing lights and a backdrop of the Santa Rosa mountain range that might as well be an oil painting. Coachella looks best when…

Hey there! While the team is hard at work on a slew of important, often requested improvements to PicsArt (more soon…), I wanted to take this moment to answer any questions you might have. The main reason I write these Community Updates is to increase transparency between PicsArt and our passionate community members. We have blog posts for releases, but we also have Community Updates. Why? Because your concerns and needs deserve attention. I do my best to anticipate them, notifying you of upcoming features or addressing hot topics, but this time I want to put the ball in your court by allowing you to ask me (and the team) anything. I’ll answer your questions in next week’s update. You can submit your questions here. No question is off-limits, so feel free to ask about our photo editor, Explore Page, your profile, etc. I probably won’t be able to answer…

PicsArt is a powerful photo editor. Our blog is a destination to arm yourself with ideas, inspiration and stories to help you use PicsArt to its fullest. Together, they help you create and discover. Earlier this year, we rededicated ourselves to our blog. It’s now much more elegant and easier to navigate than ever. Most importantly, however, we’re spending more time making sure that we bring you the best, most engaging content. Megan and her team have been working super hard making sure there’s something worth reading every day. I think they’ve been doing a pretty great job. That’s why I want to use this week’s Community Update to show you some of my personal favorite pieces — just in case you haven’t seen them.  Living vicariously through the @thefourthjonas Ever want to walk the red carpet? Brush shoulders with the stars? So does Dara Phung (@thefourthjonas). Thing is, she goes…

Today, I’m happy to announce a new account on PicsArt named @FreeToEdit, but first I want to tell you a story… The other day, I saw a super awesome edit that used photos of stars. I thought, “Man, I want to make that!” So I searched through my photos for star pictures. Meh. Didn’t find anything. I searched through ‪#‎FreeToEdit, but I still couldn’t find the perfect image. It was then I decided to check out public domain images from the Hubble Space Telescope on my computer. And that’s when it hit me: why doesn’t PicsArt help surface free-to-use, royalty-free, attribution-not-required, public domain images to its users? Now we do. That’s why we now have the official @FreeToEdit account. It exists to help you and others beautify the world without being restricted by your location, quality of camera or ability to travel. The account will post public domain images from a variety of legitimate sources…