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Calling all Galaxy Explorers! We have some positively interstellar news: NASA opened up its entire media library for you to explore, create and share your way across every known corner of outer space, copyright free. via PicsArt Here at PicsArt, we completely understand the gravity of this situation. Space edits have been a PicsArt staple since Pluto was considered a planet (RIP). Our space-savvy PicsArtists have been using free-to-edit images, special cosmic packs, and every trick in the PicsArt toolbelt to bring us from the Moon, to Mars and beyond. NASA’s image library going public is nothing short of a supernova for our PicsArt Galaxy. Here’s what you need to know to conquer the photo-editing universe. via PicsArt NASA makes it as easy as can be to find the perfect image. You can search their database for keywords to narrow down your search, and each image comes with incredible space…

Every once in a while, the world is lucky enough to see a revolutionary mind changing the way we understand the very universe we live in. This past Wednesday, we said goodbye to one of those minds. Stephen Hawking, the very man that bragged about being born on the 300th anniversary of Galileo’s death, died himself on the anniversary of Albert Einstein’s birth. The fact that it was Pi (3.14) day almost seems too coincidental, but nobody understood that the universe works in funny ways better than Hawking himself. via PicsArt After Stephen Hawking passed away, former US President Barack Obama nearly broke the internet with a short but heart-wrenching tweet. The PicsArt community brought Obama’s tweet to life. Have fun out there among the stars. pic.twitter.com/S285MTwGtp — Barack Obama (@BarackObama) 14 de marzo de 2018 via PicsArt There are plenty of things that make PicsArt magical. Beyond the…

When I was younger, I wanted nothing more than to be an astronaut and travel into space (then I grew up and realized how much math is involved, and quickly changed my mind). Something about the unknown, the colors, the mystery and the sheer magnitude always drew me in — it still does. Space never ceases to blow my mind and take my breath away, whether I’m watching the sun set, the moon rise, or wishing on a shooting star. But there is so much more to space that most of us can comprehend. Astrophotography has not only created beautiful works of art, but it has had an astronomical impact on space research. By using long exposures (and we mean loooooooong exposures), cameras are able to photograph dim stars, nebulae and galaxies that are usually invisible to the human eye. To celebrate National Space Day, here are some of the…

Having always lived in cities, I never really appreciated stargazing photos until I started traveling. I remember being in the back of a truck on a volunteer trip in Honduras, looking up and letting out a shocked cry. They were BEAUTIFUL. While memories are great, I prefer photos. But no matter how hard I tried photographing stars in all of the places I traveled, I could never capture what I wished to keep. So I just gave up, and appreciated that I was seeing them at all. Now that I work with such awesome and creative photographers, on a recent trip to Tahoe, two of them inspired me by so easily taking this shot: I was like, “wait, it’s that easy?” So, before a recent trip to Joshua Tree, Carter (your favorite Community Manager!) was kind enough to lend me one of his cameras and share the steps for photographing…

Gaze up at a sea of stars from some of Earth’s most majestic landscapes in these 10 shots captured by PicsArtists around the world. These users ventured to some of the world’s most beautiful places in the dark of night, from snow-capped mountain peaks to red-rock deserts, to look up at the same night sky. The photos themselves capture the stars in mind-blowing detail and glimpse as far into space as the Milky Way Galaxy. 1. Zodiacal light glows over the horizon in the American Pacific Northwest. 2. Palm trees under the stars of Maui. 3. The Northern Lights in Jasper National Park, Canada. 4. A sprawling wheat field underneath the stars. 5. Graffiti set against a sparkling night sky. 6. The Milky Way emerges from behind the clouds over Mt. Hood, Oregon. 7. Stars light up the desert sky in Oman. 8. Californian redwoods circling the stars. 9. The Milky Way…