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artist rituals

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Art can sometimes release us into another state of mind, freeing us from our current reality and immersing us in the world that the artist would like us to see. How are those worlds/subject matters created? How exactly does an artist go from idea to creation? Mary Zins, a Seattle-based artist, gives us a sneak peak into her process of creation. 1. The Nouveau Traditionalist Both a fine artist and a freelance illustrator, Mary Zins’ inspiration comes from the beauty of the animal kingdom and illustrated portraiture. She shares, “I do both traditional fine art painting as well as vector-based artwork (computer-generated). In my fine art I use graphite and acrylic paints on canvas, crossing from impressionist to realistic styles. My subject is nature-based and usually animals, for there is a soulfulness and beauty in the animal kingdom that I just can’t find anywhere else.” 2. Soul Binding Mary’s goal as an…

Albert Einstein once said, “I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” Artists are often admired for embracing the gift and talent of imagination and incorporating it into their personal daily rituals. We explore this concept with San Francisco-based artist Shane Izykowski. Shane is a multimedia artist, whose works include painting, drawing, photography, filmmaking and special effects makeup.   1. The Storyteller  Shane’s work as an artist focuses on creating narrative stories. His goal is to make work that can be attainable for anyone observing the art. If you find yourself in a moment of contemplative thought, it is intentional. “At the root of my work, it can be broken down to something simplistic: a portrait of a person or an animal, colors, hands or a different world. These simple concepts, at face…

Some photographs make you feel and think of moments in life quite deeply. Photographer Feather Weight creates those kinds of images. Her work is both intense and invigorating. We touched base with her to discover what rituals she partakes in when creating her work.  1 . Emotional and Intellectual Connection  Every artist has a mission or a goal when creating their work. Feather’s goal is met when her work both moves and/or inspires her viewer — especially if it inspires intellectual conversation. “If a photograph can communicate an idea or emote a particular emotion, then I have done my job.” 2. The Morning Bird Gets the Worm  As a morning person, Feather has more of a free-form schedule. If the day inspires creativity, other art forms are used to express what she aims to create next. “If I’m in a creative kind of day, I generally make images in the afternoon and…

As the creative goddess Twyla Tharp once said, “Before you can think out of the box, you have to start with a box.” Artists tend to do this in more ways than one. So how exactly does the artist go from the box to the creation? New York/LA-based artist Ryan Spence (aka Planet Lucid) gives us a glimpse of his creative process. Ryan’s work is best described as surreal Afrofuturistic social commentary, avant­-garde afro-­anime that creates subjects that balance fine lines between real and surreal. Containing elements of anger and sarcasm, Ryan’s characters are primarily black and highlight Afrocentric features and themes.   1.The Thought Process Though a creator of the night, Ryan’s process begins in the morning with recorded thoughts. “I write down my ideas and plans earlier in the day and afternoon, then create the actual art later at night. A good friend of mine, Brook Stephenson, who…

As they say, “the stuff of daily life can reveal hidden stories” (Anonymous). And so we’re piqued to know how different artists are inspired, what they do to stay motivated, and the little things that make them the most productive. In the spirit of Women’s History Month, we’ve asked Los Angeles-based artist and #girlboss Allison Kunath to share her artist rituals with us. Describing her work as “Abstract Representationalism” with a mission to facilitate the importance of connection, Allison’s work can be found both on large-scale canvases and on the streets of LA. “If each person who sees my work has a moment of insight or reflection in some new way about their relationship to themselves, or someone close to them, I’ll be pleased.” Below, she shares some of her favorite works, and how she organizes her day. 1. Morning Rituals “Breaking a sweat in the morning helps my energy…